Cross Fencing Is An Important Tool

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You will have more grass for your horse in the spring and summer months if you can rotate your pastures

When you divide a field into sections. They have the opportunity to recover. Horses are more active and there hooves and weight can take it toll on a field. They tend to break of the grass closer to the ground leaving a compromised plant. Giving each field 3 weeks to recover helps create healthy grass for your horse.

I like to design my pastures so that most connect to a winter paddocks. That way the water source, shelter and hay feeder are attached to a field. I can open or close a gate when I want to keep them on or off a field.

Horses tend to damage the grass along a cross fence. This would be a good spot to reseed in the fall once Oregon rain's set in.

When To Graze

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Feed, groom and rest pastures like you do your horse.

There are tools to keep you pastures lush green and healthy.

  • Mow your field before it starts to go to seed.
  • Divide your pasture into at least 4 sections & rotate horses weekly or before it gets below 3 inches.
  • Collect soil samples and get it tested for lacking nutrients
  • Fertilize or spread composted manure on fields in spring and fall.
  • Chain drag your field to spread manure from horses throughout field.
  • Spread grass seed on barren areas between October & November.
  • Before grass starts to produce seed, put horses back on.
  • This photo shows grass starting to go to seed. Put horses on a field before this stage or put into hay.

We Reseed Instead Of Starting From Scratch

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The pictures at right show our field before we had winter paddocks and started working on keeping our grass healthy.

Winter paddocks are an important tool in keeping our pastures healthy. A healthy pasture profides good continuous feed for your horse to eat. While it may help prevent ulcers you need to introcuce grass slowly in the spring.

If you plow your field, it takes more then a year for the roots to establish, since horses are so tough on pastures.

We found that it was faster for us to mow, fertilize and to reseed pastures in fall. If you mow the field after your horses eat a field, you prevent the weeds from going to seed. I look at it like this. Anything a horse eats is good and anything they don't eat is a weed. Make sure you mow after rotating them to another pasture, ortherwise all that stuff that they didn't eat will go to seed.

I like to throw down endophyte free rye grass seed on the fields in the fall. It is less expensive, is very hardy, and will grow even in the cooler parts of Western Oregon fall temperatures.

We also spot spray weeds that are difficult to get rid of.

We use the herbicide Garland on berry vine, Canadian thistle, holly and other noxious weeds.

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Pasture Care Is Like Horse Carel

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Feed, groom and rest pastures like you do your horse.

There are tools to keep you pastures lush green and healthy.

  • Mow your field before it starts to go to seed.
  • Divide your pasture into at least 4 sections & rotate horses weekly or before it gets below 3 inches.
  • Collect soil samples and get it tested for lacking nutrients
  • Fertilize or spread composted manure on fields in spring and fall.
  • Chain drag your field to spread manure from horses throughout field.
  • Spread grass seed on barren areas between October & November.

Watch Our Horse Talk

Directions To Farm

Click on Directions to go to Mapquest. Once you turn left onto Rock Creek Rd, you will go 1/4 of a mile and turn left at end of round wood rail fence.

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Contact Shadysprings

Reasonably priced lessons, training & board for the horse owner wanting great service. Come visit & take a tour or watch a lesson.

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Address: 16340 NW Rock Creek Rd. Portland, 97231
Barn: 503-621-6932
Mobile: 503-799-7082
E-mail: ssfarm@me.com

Contact Trainers

Lee Jorgensen: Hunter/ Jumper/ Equitation

Phone: (360) 904-8626
E-mail: fairwindfarms@gmail.com

Courtney Reid: Hunter/ Jumper/ Equitation

Phone: ((503) 314-4708
E-mail: creid.crossroads@gmail.com